ACM Web Science 2013, May 2-4th in Paris

Presenters

Head Start: nominated for Best Poster at #Websci13

May 16, 2013
by Lisa Harris

Head Start: Improving Academic Literature Search with Overview Visualizations based on Readership Statistics was co-written by Peter Kraker, Kris Jack, Christian Schlögl, Christoph Trattner, and Stefanie Lindstaedt.  Head Start is an interactive visualization of the research field of Educational Technology based on co-readership structures. The abstract is copied below:

“At the beginning of a scientific study, it is usually quite hard to get an overview of a research field. We aim to address this problem of classic literature search using web data. In this extended abstract, we present work-in-progress on an interactive visualization of research fields based on readership statistics from the social reference management system Mendeley. To that end, we use library co-occurrences as a measure of subject similarity. In a first evaluation, we find that the visualization covers current research areas within educational technology but presents a view that is biased by the characteristics of readers. With our presentation, we hope to elicit feedback from theWebsci’13 audience on (1) the usefulness of the prototype, and (2) how to overcome the aforementioned biases using collaborative construction techniques.”

Web Science for Ancient History: winning poster at #websci13

May 16, 2013
by Lisa Harris

By

The first few days of May, 2013 saw large numbers of a new breed of interdisciplinary researchers gather together at Le Palais des Congres de Paris for the ACM Web Science 2013 conference. The newly emerging discipline of Web Science examines the phenomenon of the Web and examines content, interactions and behaviour online.

The main perspective is one of social and technological co-constitution: the future of the Web is a mix of what is technologically possible, and socially desirable, and that neither social nor technical considerations are exclusively the determinative for the course of future development.

A crowd-sourced vote of attendees at the venue led to the selection of our poster as the winner – a very good sign considering this project relies extensively on public engagement and harnessing public enthusiasm for the subject matter!

The extended abstract for the paper can be accessed here

 

#WebSci13 Presenter Profile: Takis Metaxas

April 30, 2013
by Lisa Harris

The Rise and the Fall of a Citizen Reporter (Analysis of the Mexican Narco-tweets)

“Big Data” present an opportunity (even an obsession) to many researchers and companies, but they can miss some important human stories behind the data. Analyzing the “narco-tweets” sent by Mexicans trying to protect themselves from the war between competing drug cartels, the Police and the Army, we detect how  anonymous citizen reporters can become sources of trusted information filling the gap left by News organizations. Big data analytics point to some unusual patterns in the online presence of the most prominent citizen reporter, but they cannot tell what really is happening. She is accused falsely as collaborating with the drug cartels, her real identity exposed and terrorized.  In this paper http://bit.ly/narcotweets we describe how we managed to match the important twitter messages to events on the ground and figure out what really happened. The paper, co-authored with Prof. Eni Mustafaraj, will be presented at the WebScience 2013 conference this Friday, May 4, at 2PM.

Prof. P. Takis Metaxas is interested in research on social networks, multimedia, parallel computing, image dithering and CS education. His current projects involve studying the predictive power of social network data, especially related to the prediction of political events, and in developing tools to support the privacy of the user while evaluating the trustworthiness of the information the user receives. He is a member of the CRA’s Board of Directors, a senior member of the ACM, and a member of LACS, IEEE Computer Society, SIGWEB, SIGCSE and SIGACT.

The #WebSci13 conference runs from 2nd – 4th May in Paris. More information about the programme is available here

Any other #websci13 presenters who would like to be featured on our blog, please contact @lisaharris

 

#WebSci13 Presenter profile: Henry S Thompson

April 26, 2013
by Lisa Harris

_URIs in data: for entities, or for descriptions of entities: A critical analysis_

by Henry S Thompson, Jonathan A Rees and Jeni Tennison

This paper arises from our long-running effort as members of the W3C’s Technical Architecture Group to improve interoperability for data which includes URIs as identifiers.  Underspecification in the foundational specs for the Web has led to incompatible ‘extensions’ as regards what URIs ‘mean’ or ‘identify’ or ‘denote’, particularly when they occur outside HTML pages, e.g. in JSON, RDF or XML.  Having concluded that there is no prospect of eliminating these incompatibilities, we have turned our efforts instead towards best practices for achieving interoperability despite them.

Henry S. Thompson divides his time between the School of Informatics at the University of Edinburgh, where he is Professor of Web Informatics, based in the Institute for Language, Cognition and Computation, and independent consulting on XML- and web-related business strategy.

He was a member of the SGML Working Group of the World Wide Web Consortium which designed XML, a major contributor to the core concepts of XSLT and W3C XML Schema and is currently a member of the XML Core and XML Processing Model Working Groups of the W3C. He has been elected five times to the W3C TAG (Technical Architecture Group). He was lead editor of the Structures part of the XML Schema W3C Recommendation, for which he co-wrote the first publicly available implementation, XSV.  From 2002 through 2010 he was a member of the technical staff of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), where he worked in the XML Activity.  He has presented many lectures, papers and tutorials on SGML, DSSSL, XML, XSLT, XML Schema, XML Pipelines and Web Architecture in both industrial and public settings over the last sixteen years.

The #WebSci13 conference runs from 2nd – 4th May in Paris. More information about the programme is available here

Any other #websci13 presenters who would like to be featured on our blog, please contact @lisaharris

 

Speaker profile: Aristea M. Zafeiropoulou

April 16, 2013
by Lisa Harris

Unpicking the Privacy Paradox: Can Structuration Theory Help to Explain Location-Based Privacy Decisions?

By Aristea M. Zafeiropoulou, David E. Millard, Craig Webber and Kieron O’Hara

This paper presents a study into privacy and location sharing, using quantitative analysis to show the presence of the privacy paradox, and qualitative analysis in order to reveal the factors that lie behind it. The analysis indicates that privacy decision-making can be seen as a process of structuration, in that people do not make location-sharing decisions as entirely free agents and are instead heavily influenced by contextual factors (external structures) during trade-off decisions. This work has important consequences both for the understanding of how users arrive at privacy decisions, and also for the potential design of privacy systems.

Aristea became fascinated with Web Science from the first moment, when she attended the 1st Web Science Conference that took place in Athens where she was working as a Software Engineer.

The #WebSci13 conference runs from 2nd – 4th May in Paris. More information about the programme is available here

Any other #websci13 presenters who would like to be featured on our blog, please contact @lisaharris

 

 

 

 

Presenter Profiles: Clare Hooper

April 16, 2013
by Lisa Harris

Clare Hooper works at the University of Southampton’s IT Innovation Centre. Originally trained as a Computer Scientist, Clare has been involved in Web Science from its early days, spoken about the topic at various venues, and published material at every WebSci conference to date. Clare is a passionate advocate for solid education to let us do good Web Science — and ensure that the rest of the world knows what Web Science is.

This year, Clare will present her paper “Web Science and the Two (Hundred) Cultures: Representation of Disciplines Publishing in Web Science”. Motivated by discussion and (at times) uncertainty in the WebSci community about its disciplinary composition, Clare has worked with colleagues to gain empirical insight into disciplinary presence in WebSci. This paper builds on work from 2012, describing: the application of Natural Language Processing and topic extraction to hundreds of Web Science articles; the subsequent graphing and visualisation of the extracted topics; and an expert review to gain insight into links between extracted topics and research disciplines. The work identified four sub-communities, trends in the Web Science conference, and which disciplines have stronger links with Web Science. Controversially, the expert review revealed a disparity between extracted topics and the topics that experts associate with Web Science.

The #WebSci13 conference runs from 2nd – 4th May in Paris. More information about the programme is available here

Any other #websci13 presenters who would like to be featured on our blog, please contact @lisaharris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speaker Profile: Mark Frank

April 15, 2013
by Lisa Harris

Mark’s paper is co-authored with Tim Davies and is titled  ‘There’s no such thing as raw data’. Exploring the socio-technical life of a government dataset”.

Mark worked in IT for most of his life and opted to take a PhD in his retirement.

The paper describes a short investigation into the processes behind the publishing of some research data as part of the UK government Open Data policy. The authors originally intended to use the data for their own research but when they inspected it they found, that although it merited 3 out of 5 stars of Open Data, it was actually very difficult to reuse. They decided to try and uncover the story of how the research data was produced. The resulting narrative illustrates how social and technical features behind the publishing of open data,  which are not normally apparent, can greatly affect the meaning and value of that data.

The #WebSci13 conference runs from 2nd – 4th May in Paris. More information about the programme is available here

Any other #websci13 presenters who would like to be featured on our blog, please contact @lisaharris

 

 

 

 

Speaker Profile: Richard Fyson

April 14, 2013
by Lisa Harris

Richard is a PhD student at the University of Southampton. He studied computer science at Southampton before moving on to Web Science in order to familiarise himself with a range of new disciplines.

Richard’s paper, “AltOA: A Framework for Dissemination Through Disintermediation” endeavours to provide a new approach on the issues that concern scholarly communication, moving beyond  some of the problems addressed by the traditional Open Access flavours. By examining the publishing ecosystem from the perspective of a number of key stakeholders, the paper makes a number of recommendations, principally that of elevating the role of the researcher in dissemination and adjusting the nature of those intermediaries that are the publishers. This in turn leads to new methods for presenting findings, recognising researchers for their contributions to their academic communities and measuring impact.

The #WebSci13 conference runs from 2nd – 4th May in Paris. More information about the programme is available here

Any other #websci13 presenters who would like to be featured on our blog, please contact @lisaharris

 

Stéphane Bazan

April 12, 2013
by Lisa Harris

Stéphane works at Saint-Joseph University in Beirut, Lebanon. In 2000, he started the Interdisciplinary Research Unit in Web Science at SJU’s Centre for Research on the Modern Arab World. Gathering students from history, social science and international relations, he decided to study the Web from a contextual view point, the Arab World. The UIR’s Research projects include “Cyberwarfare on the Web” and “Web Science Education”. Working languages are French, Arabic and English.

This year in Paris, Stéphane will present two different researches: the first paper entitled “The Web Science Curriculum at work: The Digital Economy Master Program at USJ-Beirut” and written with Dr. Michalis Vafopoulos, presents the theoretic process behind the creation of a new Master program in Digital economy. The second paper, an abstract written with Kristine Gloria and Qingpeng Zhang from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, will raise the following question: “When Freedom Goes Global: Are We All Equally Safe On Social Media?”. This research aims at showing through contextualized examples (Syria and France) that Internationalization of use and users is the next big challenge for social media companies on the Web.

And don’t forget that ACM Web Science starts May 1st with very interactive workshops: Stéphane will be your host at the Web Science Education Worskhop in the afternoon and also will present a paper at the Social Theory Workshop in the morning on how social science could help understand the “Spring” of the Arab Web.

The #WebSci13 conference runs from 2nd – 4th May in Paris. More information about the programme is available here

Any other #websci13 presenters who would like to be featured on our blog, please contact @lisaharris

 

 

 

Chris Phethean

April 12, 2013
by Lisa Harris

Chris is a PhD student at the University of Southampton. He began as a social scientist, converted to computer science, and was drawn to web science so he could synthesise the two.

His paper is titled “Rethinking Measurements Of Social Media Use By Charities: A Mixed Methods Approach”. It presents the results of a study into how – and why – charities use social media for marketing. Aiming to ensure that specific requirements are met when measuring social media performance, the paper provides the groundwork for creating a framework of metrics and analytical tools that can determine the level of success that charities achieve from using social media. This is a fundamental step in order to ensure that social media provides charities with benefits.

The #WebSci13 conference runs from 2nd – 4th May in Paris. More information about the programme is available here

Any other #websci13 presenters who would like to be featured on our blog, please contact @lisaharris

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