ACM Web Science 2013, May 2-4th in Paris

Vint Cerf Keynote

April 19, 2013
by Hugh Davis

Vint Cerf, the “godfather” of the internet and an inductee of the Internet Hall of Fame will be presenting the   opening keynote for ACM WebSci13 on the morning of Thursday May 2nd, in association with ACM CHI and the other ECRC conferences. Vint’s presentation is titled: “Conversations with a computer.”

Cory Doctorow Keynote

April 19, 2013
by Lisa Sugiura

Cory Doctorow is a novelist and technology activist. He is the co-editor of the popular weblog Boing Boing (boingboing.net<http://boingboing.net/>), and a contributor to The Guardian, the New York Times, Publishers Weekly, Wired, and many other newspapers, magazines and websites. He was formerly Director of European Affairs for the Electronic Frontier Foundation. He holds an honorary doctorate in computer science from the Open University (UK), where he is a Visiting Senior Lecturer; in 2007, he served as the Fulbright Chair at the Annenberg Center for Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California.

His latest young adult novel is PIRATE CINEMA, a story of mashup guerillas who declare war on the entertainment industry. His latest novel for adults is RAPTURE OF THE NERDS, written with Charles Stross and published in 2012. His 2008 Bestseller LITTLE BROTHER describes a kid with a knack for programming who finds himself leading the  resistance to a government takeover of the Web. A sequel, HOMELAND, will be published this February.

Cory’s presentation is titled: “Computer scientists save the world” or, “HOWTO: teach politicians the most important thing they need to understand about general purpose computers and end-to-end networks.” Of all the technical fallacies that politicians fall prey to, none is so deadly as the idea that you can solve problems by selectively breaking computers. What’s more, the problem is about to get much, much worse. Computer scientists must close ranks on this score and make policymakers understand that there is no such thing as a computer that runs every program we can compile except for the one that frightens voters, and that trying to solve problems by selectively breaking computers inevitably converges on rootkits.

#WebSci13 Boat Trip

April 17, 2013
by Lisa Harris

Friday, May 3
Vessel Boarding Time: 20:00

Boat: Capitaine Fracasse
L’Ile au Cygnes (Paris 15th, near the Eiffel Tower)

Metro: Line 6: “Bir Hakeim” / RER C
“Champ de Mars Tour Eiffel”

See the sights and network with colleagues during a relaxing 2-hour Seine River cruise through the heart of historic Paris. Our modern vessel glides effortlessly past the most iconic landmarks of Paris such as the Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame and Ile D’Cité, the Pont de l’Alma, and the Musée d’Orsay. Cruise includes pre-dinner cocktail, gourmet three-course dinner with wine service, and 2 hours sailing time. Departure from Ile aux Cygnes (access from Pont de Bir-Hakeim).

Directions: Down the stairs in the middle of the Pont Bir Hakeim Bridge, located opposite the No. 1 Quai de Grenelle. If you get lost, call. . . 06 20 80 75 30

Speaker profile: Aristea M. Zafeiropoulou

April 16, 2013
by Lisa Harris

Unpicking the Privacy Paradox: Can Structuration Theory Help to Explain Location-Based Privacy Decisions?

By Aristea M. Zafeiropoulou, David E. Millard, Craig Webber and Kieron O’Hara

This paper presents a study into privacy and location sharing, using quantitative analysis to show the presence of the privacy paradox, and qualitative analysis in order to reveal the factors that lie behind it. The analysis indicates that privacy decision-making can be seen as a process of structuration, in that people do not make location-sharing decisions as entirely free agents and are instead heavily influenced by contextual factors (external structures) during trade-off decisions. This work has important consequences both for the understanding of how users arrive at privacy decisions, and also for the potential design of privacy systems.

Aristea became fascinated with Web Science from the first moment, when she attended the 1st Web Science Conference that took place in Athens where she was working as a Software Engineer.

The #WebSci13 conference runs from 2nd – 4th May in Paris. More information about the programme is available here

Any other #websci13 presenters who would like to be featured on our blog, please contact @lisaharris

 

 

 

 

Presenter Profiles: Clare Hooper

April 16, 2013
by Lisa Harris

Clare Hooper works at the University of Southampton’s IT Innovation Centre. Originally trained as a Computer Scientist, Clare has been involved in Web Science from its early days, spoken about the topic at various venues, and published material at every WebSci conference to date. Clare is a passionate advocate for solid education to let us do good Web Science — and ensure that the rest of the world knows what Web Science is.

This year, Clare will present her paper “Web Science and the Two (Hundred) Cultures: Representation of Disciplines Publishing in Web Science”. Motivated by discussion and (at times) uncertainty in the WebSci community about its disciplinary composition, Clare has worked with colleagues to gain empirical insight into disciplinary presence in WebSci. This paper builds on work from 2012, describing: the application of Natural Language Processing and topic extraction to hundreds of Web Science articles; the subsequent graphing and visualisation of the extracted topics; and an expert review to gain insight into links between extracted topics and research disciplines. The work identified four sub-communities, trends in the Web Science conference, and which disciplines have stronger links with Web Science. Controversially, the expert review revealed a disparity between extracted topics and the topics that experts associate with Web Science.

The #WebSci13 conference runs from 2nd – 4th May in Paris. More information about the programme is available here

Any other #websci13 presenters who would like to be featured on our blog, please contact @lisaharris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speaker Profile: Mark Frank

April 15, 2013
by Lisa Harris

Mark’s paper is co-authored with Tim Davies and is titled  ‘There’s no such thing as raw data’. Exploring the socio-technical life of a government dataset”.

Mark worked in IT for most of his life and opted to take a PhD in his retirement.

The paper describes a short investigation into the processes behind the publishing of some research data as part of the UK government Open Data policy. The authors originally intended to use the data for their own research but when they inspected it they found, that although it merited 3 out of 5 stars of Open Data, it was actually very difficult to reuse. They decided to try and uncover the story of how the research data was produced. The resulting narrative illustrates how social and technical features behind the publishing of open data,  which are not normally apparent, can greatly affect the meaning and value of that data.

The #WebSci13 conference runs from 2nd – 4th May in Paris. More information about the programme is available here

Any other #websci13 presenters who would like to be featured on our blog, please contact @lisaharris

 

 

 

 

Speaker Profile: Richard Fyson

April 14, 2013
by Lisa Harris

Richard is a PhD student at the University of Southampton. He studied computer science at Southampton before moving on to Web Science in order to familiarise himself with a range of new disciplines.

Richard’s paper, “AltOA: A Framework for Dissemination Through Disintermediation” endeavours to provide a new approach on the issues that concern scholarly communication, moving beyond  some of the problems addressed by the traditional Open Access flavours. By examining the publishing ecosystem from the perspective of a number of key stakeholders, the paper makes a number of recommendations, principally that of elevating the role of the researcher in dissemination and adjusting the nature of those intermediaries that are the publishers. This in turn leads to new methods for presenting findings, recognising researchers for their contributions to their academic communities and measuring impact.

The #WebSci13 conference runs from 2nd – 4th May in Paris. More information about the programme is available here

Any other #websci13 presenters who would like to be featured on our blog, please contact @lisaharris

 

Full Program

April 13, 2013
by Hugh Davis

We have a first draft of the full program available on the Program Tab on the menu.  It looks to be an exciting and truly interdisciplinary conference!

Stéphane Bazan

April 12, 2013
by Lisa Harris

Stéphane works at Saint-Joseph University in Beirut, Lebanon. In 2000, he started the Interdisciplinary Research Unit in Web Science at SJU’s Centre for Research on the Modern Arab World. Gathering students from history, social science and international relations, he decided to study the Web from a contextual view point, the Arab World. The UIR’s Research projects include “Cyberwarfare on the Web” and “Web Science Education”. Working languages are French, Arabic and English.

This year in Paris, Stéphane will present two different researches: the first paper entitled “The Web Science Curriculum at work: The Digital Economy Master Program at USJ-Beirut” and written with Dr. Michalis Vafopoulos, presents the theoretic process behind the creation of a new Master program in Digital economy. The second paper, an abstract written with Kristine Gloria and Qingpeng Zhang from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, will raise the following question: “When Freedom Goes Global: Are We All Equally Safe On Social Media?”. This research aims at showing through contextualized examples (Syria and France) that Internationalization of use and users is the next big challenge for social media companies on the Web.

And don’t forget that ACM Web Science starts May 1st with very interactive workshops: Stéphane will be your host at the Web Science Education Worskhop in the afternoon and also will present a paper at the Social Theory Workshop in the morning on how social science could help understand the “Spring” of the Arab Web.

The #WebSci13 conference runs from 2nd – 4th May in Paris. More information about the programme is available here

Any other #websci13 presenters who would like to be featured on our blog, please contact @lisaharris

 

 

 

Chris Phethean

April 12, 2013
by Lisa Harris

Chris is a PhD student at the University of Southampton. He began as a social scientist, converted to computer science, and was drawn to web science so he could synthesise the two.

His paper is titled “Rethinking Measurements Of Social Media Use By Charities: A Mixed Methods Approach”. It presents the results of a study into how – and why – charities use social media for marketing. Aiming to ensure that specific requirements are met when measuring social media performance, the paper provides the groundwork for creating a framework of metrics and analytical tools that can determine the level of success that charities achieve from using social media. This is a fundamental step in order to ensure that social media provides charities with benefits.

The #WebSci13 conference runs from 2nd – 4th May in Paris. More information about the programme is available here

Any other #websci13 presenters who would like to be featured on our blog, please contact @lisaharris

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